Bedford County Sheriff’s Office Needs Information About Recent Thefts

Between the dates of March 11th and March 13th 2015 unknown subject or subjects entered the property of Witt Mechanical located at 2990 E. Lynchburg Salem Turnpike Bedford Va. At that time, a 1982 Chevrolet Suburban and1997 Easy Ride utility trailer 18-20 ft tilt bed car hauler were stolen.

Utility Trailer

Utility Trailer

Stolen Chevy Suburban

Stolen Suburban

Anyone with information is asked to contact the Bedford County Sheriffs Office and speak with Inv. Steve Smith: phone (540-586-4800 EXT. 4076 /540-586 7827). You can submit a tip via our anonymous tip form and you may also make an anonymous report to Central Virginia Crime stoppers at 1-888-798-5900. Information leading to the arrest and subsequent conviction are subject to a reward up to $1000.00

 

Forest Man Arrested on Charges Related to the Possession of Child Pornography

sova-icac logoApril 10, 2015
Bedford, VA

On April 7, 2015, Cameron Boyd, of Forest, VA, was arrested on charges related to the possession of child pornography.

In 2013 Cameron Boyd became a person of interest to the SOVA-ICAC when a Detective from Lynchburg Police Department downloaded child pornography from a suspect believed to be within the city of Lynchburg. Further investigation led to the discovery that the suspect lived in Bedford County, at which point the case was referred to the Bedford Sheriff’s Office.

In 2014, investigators from the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office’s assigned to the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Unit, executed a search warrant at the residence of Boyd, 27, of Forest, Virginia, seeking evidence related to the internet activity involving the possession of child pornography. Numerous pieces of evidence were collected, including laptop computers, and digital storage media, which were submitted for forensic analysis. Upon completion of the analysis, the case was presented to the Commonwealth’s Attorney’s office for review, and Boyd was subsequently indicted by a grand jury on April 3, 2015.

Lynchburg Police Department is an affiliate agency with the Southern Virginia Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, which has been administered by the Bedford Sheriff’s Office since the task force program was created in 1998, through a federal grant.

Download the PDF Press Release

Bedford County Sheriff’s Office Continues to Investigate Deaths of Two Individuals

bcso

PRESS RELEASE
April 10, 2015
(UPDATE)

Bedford County Sheriff’s investigators continue to investigate the deaths of the two individuals on Jane Randolph Street in Forest. Investigators identified the two individuals as Curtis L. Brumfield, age 58 and Susan C. Brumfield, age 56. In addition to the bodies found at the scene, additional items of physical evidence will be submitted to the forensic science laboratory in Roanoke. The exact manner and cause of death can only be determined by a complete and thorough autopsy. The autopsy and the examination of the forensic evidence may take several weeks or more before any investigative conclusions can be reached. Preliminary investigation of these deaths does not indicate the involvement of a third party.

However, the investigation is ongoing.
Bedford County Sheriff’s investigators are not making assumptions concerning the two deaths. But will follow where ever the evidence leads them.

Download the PDF Press Release

April 9, 2015 Press Release

At 9:58 this morning, Bedford County 911 dispatchers received a call requesting a well being check on a co-worker at 115 Jane Randolph in Forest. The caller started the person had not showed up at work for a couple days.

Deputies were dispatched and arrive at 10:18 a.m. After entering the home, deputies located two deceased bodies.

Beware of These Scams!

Fraud Alert

Your phone rings. The caller ID reads “Internal Revenue Service.”  It’s the IRS calling to tell you that you owe taxes.  The agent on the phone provides their name and badge number, and the agent provides the last four digits of your Social Security number as verification. The agent tells you the amount of taxes that you owe, threatens consequences of the failure to pay back taxes such as loss of business license or jail time, and takes any questions you may have.  Next, they provide you with details on how to pay your back taxes through debit card or wire transfer.

Now the question ­– is the IRS agent real or fake?

The answer is: fake. This is the scenario of one of the latest consumer scams, which has many Americans sending their hard-earned dollars to the “IRS” only to find out that they have fallen victim to financial theft.

I shared this scenario last year. Unfortunately, it’s still one of the top reported consumer scams in the United States. In fact, tax-related identity theft was the most common form of identity theft reported to the Federal Trade Commission in 2014, while the number of complaints from consumers about criminals impersonating IRS officials was nearly 24 times more than in 2013, according to FTC statistics.

Internet and telephone consumer scams that result in identity or financial theft are becoming more sophisticated and they are often unidentifiable at first blush. Here are three recent scams to be aware of, according to the Better Business Bureau’s Top Ten Scams of 2014:

The Grandchild Emergency Scam

Scammers call pretending to be a grandchild who was arrested and robbed and needs money ASAP. They start by saying “Grandma? Can you hear me ok?” They’ll wait for the grandparent to say a grandchild’s name (“Justin? Is that you sweetheart?”). Scammers then use emotional pleas to ask for money. For instance, they might say, “Please don’t call my parents – I know they will be mad at me, but I need help and you are the only person I could turn to to bail me out. I need $5,000 for bail.” They’ll provide instructions for wiring money. Typically, these scams target older individuals who are likely to help a grandchild with no questions asked.

The Tech Support Scam

Scammers use phone call or internet pop ups on your computer. They claim to be an individual from Microsoft, Apple, or another tech company. They tell you that they received an alert that there are errors that need to be repaired on your computer. They will attempt to get remote access to your computer in order to “repair” the bug. These scams often happen at a workplace, where you may be more inclined to share information with a tech support group.

The Click Bait Scam

Scammers use popular news, like breaking news stories, celebrity images, or other enticing stories to bait you to click on a video or photograph. The click leads you to unintentionally download malware to your computer.

So how can individuals protect themselves against scams such as these? In this day of technology, consumers must learn to be vigilant in sharing and protecting personal information no matter what the platform. The following steps may help in protecting you from a scam:

First, verify the person you are speaking with or the link you have received is who he, she, or it claims to be. In all of the instances above (and with most telephone and internet scams), the scammers request personal information over a non-secure site (your mobile device, a website, or over the phone). Often, institutions have policies that state they will never request personal information by email, text, or social media. When in doubt, hang up and call the institution or agency using a phone number listed on an old bank statement, from an official website, or other trusted document. If the request is legitimate, the person will be able to direct you to an agent for assistance.

Second, don’t send money to someone you don’t know. Agencies like the IRS usually first contact people by mail about unpaid taxes. Again, calling the agency using a phone number from a trusted source will help verify an appropriate method for any necessary payments. If you use online auction sites (like eBay), the FTC recommends using a payment option that provides protection, like a credit card.  If a caller says that they are someone you know, the FBI recommends calling another family member to determine whether or not the call is legitimate. The FBI also recommends never wiring money based on a request made over the phone or in an e-mail because, “wiring money is like giving cash—once you send it, you can’t get it back.” http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2012/april/grandparent_040212

Third, learn how to keep your personal information secure online and offline. The FTC has tips for anything from securing your Social Security number to keeping your mobile devices secure: http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0272-how-keep-your-personal-information-secure.

Finally, stay up to date on the latest scams. If you suspect you’re the target of a scam, do a quick search through Google or another search engine to see if something similar has been reported in the news. The Federal Trade Commission regularly posts scam alerts on its website. You can sign up to receive scam alerts by email, too: http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts.

If you think you may have fallen victim to a scam, report the incident to the FTC at http://www.ftc.gov/complaint. Also, report scams to your state Attorney General. In Virginia, those complaints can be filed at http://www.oag.state.va.us/index.php/citizen-resources/consumer-protection.

Whitehouse Road Currently Closed Due to Structure Fire At Mayberry Diner

road closed

Bedford County Fire and Rescue Units are on the scene of a structure fire at the Mayberry Diner located at 1696 Whitehouse Road in Moneta. Whitehouse Road in currently closed and drivers are asked to avoid the area. Bedford County Fire Chief Jack Jones is the Officer in Charge at the scene.

Any further press releases of this incident will be done by Bedford County Fire and Rescue Office……

Local Man Charged with Abduction, Assault and Use of a Firearm in the Commission of a Felony.

PRESS RELEASE
April 1, 2015

BRADLEY GRAY

BRADLEY GRAY

On Tuesday March 31, 2015, Bedford County 911 dispatchers received a call from the a Roanoke County dispatcher advising they had received a call reporting a female had been abducted by gun point from the Thaxton area of Bedford County. The caller further advised that the suspect and victim were at a home in Vinton. Vinton Police responded to the address and located them. The suspect, Bradley R. Gray, age 23, the husband of the victim, was taken into custody and transported back to Bedford.

Gray was charged with abduction, assault and the use of a firearm in the commission of a felony. He is being held without bond in the Bedford Adult Detention Center.

Download the PDF Press Release

‘Felony Lane Gang’ Targeting Purses Left in Cars

A national crime network known as the “Felony Lane Gang” has stretched into metro D.C., targeting women who leave purses in cars and stealing from their bank accounts, crime analysts say.

The network is currently active in at least 34 states, drawing the attention of crime analysts who have been tracking its spread.

The gang’s M.O. sticks out: It starts when they spot a purse or wallet left visible in a car.

“They’re surveilling daycare centers, they’re surveilling shopping centers, they’re surveilling those places where people would pull in and park their car for a few minutes or a few hours,” said Louis Grever, a retired FBI agent now consulting with the Wynyard Group who has tracked the Felony Lane Gang.

The gang smashes the window if needed, then takes the purse or wallet. They immediately try to cash any checks they find, heading to drive-through banks and using the farthest lane from the teller to avoid detection.

That last-lane trick is how the gang got their name. The gang may also try to match the perpetrator to the stolen identity.

“They’ll go to extremes to try to camouflage how they look,” said Officer Bud Walker of Fairfax County Police. “And I’ve heard of wigs, and masks, and that kind of thing.”

The analysts tracking the Felony Lane Gang say the technique has spread north from South Florida in the past 10 years.

“They’ll take $900 to $1,000 at a time,” said Matt Melton, senior solutions consultant for the Wynyard Group, who has aggregated data on the gang and identified its leaders.

“You take a step back and you realize it’s a national organization that’s costing Americans tens of millions of dollars,” Melton said.

Link Source: NBC4 Washington

IRS Scam Alert – Please Share

Fraud Alert

The Bedford County Sheriff’s Office has received many calls from citizens advising they had received a call from an IRS Agent. The caller identifies themselves as an agent and tells the person that they owe the IRS money.

This is a scam and people receiving these calls are advised not to provide any personal information. The person is also advised to contact the IRS should they have a question.

Lyons Sisters Investigation Continues

Press Release
March 23, 2015

Bedford, Virginia – The ongoing investigation into the disappearance of the Lyon sisters from Maryland continues with new efforts on Taylor’s Mountain in Bedford. The investigation has developed additional leads through supplemental investigative interviews that have found cause to conduct an additional dig on the mountain in efforts to locate the missing children. This effort is being conducted collaboratively by the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office, the Virginia State Police, and the Montgomery Maryland Police Department. A representative from the Virginia Department of Forensic Science is on scene, and it is anticipated this process will take several days to complete. The dig is being done in hopes of finding additional evidence to bring a successful resolution and closure to the case from 1975.

Download the PDF Press Release

Training to Spot Cyberbullying Available to Parents and Educators

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iqf7QwigKeo&feature=youtu.be

Richmond, VA – A new training program designed to teach adults how to know if a child is being cyberbullied was unveiled today by Bedford County Sheriff Mike Brown at the Virginia State Capitol.

Brown got the idea for “Cyberbullying: Our Children, Our Problem” after reading about the suicide of a 12-year-old Florida girl.

The program is a partnership between the Safe Surfin’ foundation and the National White Collar Crime Center.

Tammy Garcia flew overnight from California to be there for the announcement. Garcia’s son Michael committed suicide in 2011.

“He was an athlete in school. He was beautiful. He was a bodybuilder and had so much going for him. He was the captain of the football team. He was getting straight A’s” said Tammy Garcia. “So for something like this to come to the point of suicide, it was shocking for our family.”

The online training is geared toward both parents and educators. It takes about 30-45 minutes to complete. Click here for a link to the training.